Car Components Transmission 

Checking a clutch cable

A typical cable-operated clutch on a front-engined car. Some cars have hydraulically operated clutches. The clutch cable has a steel-wire inner core sliding inside an outer sheath. It should last at least two years, but check it at every main service; if it breaks it may do so without warning. The heavy clutch-pedal pressure needed to work it may conceal any initial stiffness or stickiness in the cable itself. The exposed cable ends are the parts most likely to fray and break, especially at the gearbox end. To check or…

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Car Components Transmission 

How to check and change automatic transmission fluid

Check the sump pan to make sure that it is not heavily coated with mud or road dirt. Clean carefully. If there is a cooling grille, clean this also. Most faults arise because the level has dropped through evaporation or leakage (See Checking the gearbox oil level, draining and refilling), or because the engine tickover speed was incorrect when you checked the level. Check in the car handbook which particular fluid should be used for your car. Topping up with the wrong fluid can damage the transmission. (In some smaller…

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Car Components Transmission 

Adjusting the clutch

On a cable-operated clutch the adjustment is made at the cable end. The clearance is usually measured either at the operating lever or at the pedal. To work efficiently, the clutch needs the right amount of play in the linkage between the foot pedal and the clutch operating lever (also known as the release arm or fork). Anything less than the correct amount o free play (or clearance) will result in clutch slip, because the pressure plate will be unable to exert its full pressure on the friction plate. Failure to…

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Check the sump pan Transmission Car Components 

The way of check and change automatic transmission fluid

Automatic transmission needs little maintenance other than regular checking of the transmission fluid level. Most failures are caused by a level drop through evaporation or leakage (see checking the transmission fluid level, drain and injection), or because the engine is idling at such a speed that is incorrect when you check the level. Check in the car handbook which particular fluid should be used for your car. Topping up with the wrong fluid can damage the transmission. (In some smaller automatic gearboxes, such as those used in BL cars, the…

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