Car Components Bodywork 

Removing a door trim panel

A typical interior door-panel layout, showing the fittings attached on most cars. Take care when removing the panel; it is flimsy and can easily be damaged. Before a door-trim panel can be removed, the window winder and interior handle must be taken off, an probably also the push-button lock am an arm rest, if fitted. A variety of fixing methods are use for the fittings, including screws clips, press studs and lugs. Removing a window winder Removing a window winder Prise off the trim. Push out fixing pin with a…

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Car Components Bodywork 

How to clean a car interior

Regular cleaning will cut down on wear and discoloration of carpets and trim. As dirt and grit builds up on the floor, it is embedded in the pile, accelerating wear and eventually cutting through the woven backing. Stains or smears on upholstery or panels are more difficult to remove if left a long time, even on plastic. At least once a year, give the inside of the car a ‘Spring clean’. Remove the carpet if possible, and check the floor for rust and leaks carpets and underfelts tend to absorb…

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Car Components Bodywork 

Lubricating hinges, pedals and locks

Put a little clean engine oil on the pivot point above a pedal with a pendant action. Most brake and clutch pedals have a pendant action, and the pivoting parts will be above them, behind the dashboard. Use a torch to see them if necessary. Pedals with nylon bushes do not need oiling. Pedals that swing on a steel rod need a regular injection of engine oil at pivots and on rubbing surfaces. Place old newspaper under the pedals to catch drips, and clean off any surplus with a cloth….

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Car Components Bodywork 

Painting a car

Do not try to spray in damp, cold or windy conditions. When spraying on the top coats keep the aerosol can moving horizontally, and do not stop or start when you are over the areas being painted. Allow sprayed lines of paint to just overlap, but do not try to make the first top coat cover fully. Have patience – allow the paint 10-15 minutes to partly dry between coats. Six or seven coats may be needed to achieve a good blend of colour. Leave the paint to harden before…

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Car Components Bodywork 

Cleaning the outside and checking for rust

To remove the film of grime which forms on the bodywork use plenty of clean water. Do not wipe with a dry cloth — the dirt will scratch the paint. Never wash the car when the bodywork is in hot sunshine, as smears will form as it dries out too quickly. Make sure all the doors and windows are shut before you start. Soak the car thoroughly with clean, cold water; ideally use a garden hose. After soaking, wash the car body with a solution of car shampoo and tepid…

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Car Components Bodywork 

Repairing an electric window

A typical system is similar in many respects to a manual window-winding mechanism, except that the manual winder handle is replaced by a motor. The system usually consists of a two-way control switch in the dashboard or centre console, wired via two circuits to a motor in each door. One switch position and circuit drive the motor one way to wind the window up; the other switch position and circuit wind the window down. The switch is wired to the battery via a relay and a fuse or a circuit…

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where-to-check-a-car-for-rust Car Components Bodywork 

how to Clean the outside and check for rust

To remove the film of grime which forms on the bodywork use plenty of clean water. Do not wipe with a dry cloth — the dirt will scratch the paint. Never wash the car when the body is in hot sunshine, so the smear will form to dry too fast. Make sure all doors and windows are closed before you start. Cold water immersion car with a clean, thorough, ideal use of rubber hose. After soaking, wash the car body shampoo and warm water solution. Washing the car Start with…

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